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In order to get most of the good fruit in life, you have to go out on a limb

G. K. Chesterton said: “I do not believe in a fate that falls on men however they act; but I do believe in a fate that falls on them unless they act.” Put in laymen’s terms: Don’t act in life and you are fated to getting nowhere…act, and anything is possible.

What path do you want to live? The path to mediocirty or the path to unlimited possibilities? If you want possibilities, then you have to be willing to risk. The irony of people fearing risk is that there is risk all the time whether it is purposeful or not. For example: Is riding in a car risky? 20% of all fatal accidents are in an automobile. Is staying home risky? 17% of all accidents happen at home.

Any goal in life will have risks. You’ve heard it said “No risk, no reward.” So so true. Amelia Earhart had a great perspective on this: “Decide whether or not the goal is worth the risks involved. If it is, stop worrying.”

John Maxwell breaks people down into 2 categories: Don’t dare try it people and Don’t dare miss it people. The “Don’t dare try it people” have the motto: I would rather try nothing great and succeed than try something great and risk failure.” The “Don’t dare miss it people” have this motto: I would rather try something great and fail than to try nothing great and succeed.
Guess which one of these people achieve goals of value? Which one would you rather be?

Whatever you have achieved in your life to this point is a result of what you have become. Therefore, even if you risked it all and lost, you would more than likely be able to eventually gain it back. Now I am not suggesting you risk it all…I am simply making a point.
It is not too difficult to preserve what you have while you take some risks in accomplishing more.

Live as a “don’t dare miss it person” and enjoy the adventure. After all, life will be an adventure anyway since you don’t really know what will happen next.


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